January 31 in History

“Love is our true destiny. We do not find the meaning of life by ourselves alone—we find it with another.”—Fr. Thomas Merton

Thomas Merton was born on this date in 1915.

* * * *
Franz Schubert (at top) was born on this date in 1797. Only 31 when he died, he left behind almost 1000 works—several hundred songs, some individual and some in song cycles; seven officially complete symphonies and five other partial symphonies (one of which, Symphony No. 8 in B minor, the Unfinished, is one of the most performed works in most orchestra’s repertoires); and many chamber works.

Sir Georg Solti conducts the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the Unfinished:

 
* * * *
Molly Ivins died 10 years ago today. Sir Terry Wogan died one year ago today.

* * * *
Carol Channing is 96 today. Here she is thanking fans for their birthday wishes last year:

 
Kenzaburō Ōe is 82 today. Philip Glass is 80 today. From Koyaanisqatsi (1982):

 
Jessica Walter is 76 today. Representative Dick Gephardt is 76. Nolan Ryan is 70 today. The start of the 1979 MLB All Star Game:

 
Ken Wilber is 68. John Lydon is 61. “Disappointed” from 1989:

 
Minnie Driver is 47. Kerry Washington is 40 today. Justin Timberlake is 36 today.

____________________________________________
Follow The Gad About Town on Facebook! Subscribe today for daily facts (well, trivia) about literature and history, plus links to other writers on Facebook.

Follow The Gad About Town on Instagram!

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. Ernie Miller · January 31

    Hi Mark,

    I really like the “Unfinished”; I also recall a Looney Tunes cartoon about it from when I was very young and didn’t know there was color on TV.

    Just wanted to say I am an infrequent commentor (sp?) and read more than I speak.

    ernie

    Liked by 1 person

  2. loisajay · January 31

    Carol Channing…I have always loved her voice.

    Liked by 1 person

Please comment here. Thank you, Mark.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s